Daley follows through on fatigue reform


NSW implements first round of fatigue management reforms following industry-government meeting last year

NSW Minister for Roads Michael Daley has implemented his first round of fatigue management reforms following an industry-government meeting last year.

Daley has passed an exemption notice for NSW operators under the Transitional Fatigue Management Scheme (TFMS).

As a result of the change—effective only in NSW—drivers who have completed Basic Fatigue Management (BFM) training can work for a TFMS-registered company even if the company is not accredited in BFM.

Under BFM, drivers must comply with a number of requirements including being medically certified, maintaining and carrying records and passing a competency assessment.

The NSW branch of the Australian Trucking Association (ATA-NSW) says the exemption is an important win for the industry.

"Under the previous transitional arrangements, a TFMS registered driver working for a TFMS employer was able to work BFM hours.

"But a driver with more recent BFM training could only work standard hours until the employer achieved BFM certification," The ATA-NSW says.

Under BFM, drivers can work up to 14 hours a day instead of 12 under standard hours.

Daley implemented the reform following his December 18 meeting with operators as part of the Roads Freight Advisory Council.

He also plans on introducing exemptions before the end of March for specific industry sectors that cannot easily comply with the laws, such as livestock carriers.

Daley has also committed to speaking to other state and territory road ministers to ask them to address inconsistencies in fatigue management laws, which include differences in driving hours across borders.

The exemption, which requires drivers to carry copies of their employer’s TFMS certificate and confirmation of a medical assessment, will expire on September 28.



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