Cash boost for South Australia's road system


Federal Transport and Infrastructure Minister Anthony Albanese has announced South Australia will benefit from $48.4 million in extra road funding which will be immediately available to the state

Federal Transport and Infrastructure Minister Anthony Albanese has announced South Australia will benefit from $48.4 million in extra road funding which will be immediately available to the state.

The funding will be used on upgrades along the Dukes and Sturt highways and South Eastern Freeway, extra funding for road maintenance, the fixing of black spots around the State, and the installation of boom gates and other safety measures at high-risk rail crossings.

The funding package also includes $4.5 million for the upgrade of truck driver rest stops.

Initial work was originally supposed to start later in the year, however, Albanese says due to downturn in the Australian economy it is vital the work starts immediately.

"As well as putting in place the road infrastructure vital to Australia’s long term economic prosperity, this new funding will support hundreds of local jobs, provide an immediate stimulus to local economies and save lives," he says.

The Minister says the funding will come from the $26 billion Nation Building road and rail scheme, which is expected to run until 2014, and highlights the importance of a solid transport network.

"Central to the government’s nation building agenda, and essential to Australia’s international competitiveness, is a greater investment in transport infrastructure," Albanese says.

Of the $26 billion dedicated to the program, Albanese says $1.7 billion will go to South Australia.

The details of the extra funding include:

  • $5.3 million to fast track the extension of four overtaking lanes between Tailem Bend and the Victorian border, and repairs to two kilometres of road surface west of Tintinara on Dukes Highway, which will be completed this year
  • Widening of the Sturt Highway between Paringa and the Victorian border from eight to 10 metres aims to improve driving conditions and safety along 22 kilometres of road, at a cost $2.8 million
  • The reparation of 44 "black spots" on local roads, including the building of roundabouts, redesigning dangerous intersections, installing speed signs and upgrading pedestrian crossings at a cost of $7.2 million
  • An injection of $15 million to accelerate South Australia’s program of routine maintenance on the national highways running through the state, expected to be completed by the end of June 2009
  • The input of $13.65 million over the next 18 months to speed up installation of safety measures at high-risk rail crossings.

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