Police told to target 'illegal' B-doubles


Police told to increase enforcement activities after allegations of B-doubles speeding and operating illegally

There are calls for NSW police officers to increase on-road enforcement activities after allegations surfaced of B-doubles speeding and operating on illegal routes.

Greens spokeswoman on transport Lee Rhiannon has fired a shot at truck drivers carrying grain through the NSW region of Greenthorpe, saying they are putting lives at risk through reckless driving.

Speaking to locals today, Rhiannon called on police to take immediate action in the central-west of NSW, saying "it is only a matter of time before there is a serious accident".

"I was shocked to see b-doubles speeding around Greenthorpe. These activities are putting lives at risk," she says.

"The NSW police minister should ensure there is an increase in policing operations to stop b-doubles speeding and operating on illegal routes."

Rhiannon claims truck drivers have forced school buses off the road and are ignoring signals to slow down when children step off buses.

The Greens want the B-doubles banned and for the NSW Government to restore rural rail lines so grain crops are not transported via the road network.

"We will be stepping the Greens rural rail renewal campaign. A priority will be to ensure the $60 million still held by Pacific National and earmarked for rural rail upgrades is spent on branch lines," Rhiannon says.

Rhiannon was in Greenthorpe to garner support for the Greens’ campaign. The rural branch lines were suspended following the release of Treasurer Eric Roozendaal’s mini-budget.

The Greens says more than 80 people attended the public meeting in support of reinstating the rail lines.

Rhiannon's comments follow please from the Australian Trucking Association (ATA) for truck drivers to set a high standard for safe driving over the Easter long weekend.

ATA Chairman Trevor Martyn says there will be rise in the number of trucks on the road, prompting him to issue tips on how motorists can deal with the increase.

He has urged motorists against cutting in front of trucks and acting impatiently if a heavy vehicle is driving slowly.

"If you want to overtake, make sure you can see enough clear road ahead," Martyn says.

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