IAP cracks down on speeding drivers


Queensland regulators turn to IAP to boost speed compliance, citing a significant decrease in lead-foot truck drivers

IAP cracks down on speeding drivers
IAP cracks down on speeding drivers
By Brad Gardner | February 8, 2010

Data from the Intelligent Access Program (IAP) tracking device is being used to curb speeding truck drivers in Queensland.

The Department of Transport and Main Roads has confirmed it is using the data to inform operators if their drivers breach speed limits.

While saying the data is not passed on to police as part of enforcement measures, a departmental spokesperson claims the meetings are helping.

"Since engaging with these operators there has been a substantial decrease in the incidence of non-compliance," the spokesperson says.

Despite industry expectations the GPS tool would be restricted to route compliance, the spokesperson says regulators have the power to act on speed breaches.

In Queensland, the Australian Design Rule provision that specifies devices to limit the speed of heavy vehicles was inserted into the legislation.

"Compliance with Australian Design Rule 65/00 relating to speed limiting devices has been a condition of IAP from its introduction," the spokesperson says.

"The department validates the data in these reports and where there has been non-compliance with ADR 65/00, departmental representatives have spoken with the operators about effectively managing their fleet speed."

While the IAP has broad capabilities, other states have limited the tool to route compliance.

Under IAP, operators are monitored via GPS to ensure their vehicles do not stray onto routes incapable of supporting heavy vehicles.

The tracking tool has been introduced in NSW, Queensland and Victoria. South Australian operators will be able to use from July 1.


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