We won't borrow or tax for transport: Nolan


Bligh Government vows not to introduce new taxes or go into debt to fund 22-year transport plan

By Brad Gardner March 30, 2010

The Bligh Government has vowed not to introduce new taxes or borrow more funds to bankroll a new 22-year transport plan.

The plan, Connecting SEQ 2031, is due to be released mid-year and is intended to provide long-term transport funding options for south-east Queensland.

Shadow Treasurer Tim Nicholls last week asked Transport Minister Rachel Nolan how the plan would be funded and whether the price tag meant more taxes or more debt.

"No, we are not, as we have said repeatedly, planning either of those things," Nolan says.

While not detailing what will be in the plan, Nolan says it is a well-developed and integrated transport solution.

Nicholls claims SEQ 2031 will cost $225 billion over 20 years.

Nolan’s dismissal of new taxes or debt follows her pledge not to introduce a congestion charge or levy on vehicles in Queensland’s fast-growing south-east corner.

Liberal-National MP Lawrence Springborg last week sought confirmation if a congestion charge of five to 30 cents was part of the transport plan.

Opposition spokeswoman on transport Fiona Simpson also asked if a $100 annual levy on each vehicle was among the recommendations.

"The government is not considering either a road user charge or an additional vehicle charge or levy of some kind," Nolan says.

"Those things are not a part of the government’s plan and they are not a part of the government’s agenda."

Despite Nolan’s dismissals, the SEQ 2031 website says the plan will look at "increasing costs to provide transport infrastructure and services".

The Department of Transport and Main Roads is preparing the report, which will also look at issues such as congestion, greenhouse gas emissions and oil prices.



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