Fair Work goes doorknocking in Qld and NSW


The workplace watchdog will begin education blitz in Queensland and NSW to ensure businesses are meeting industrial relations obligations

August 9, 2010

The workplace watchdog will next week begin an education blitz in Queensland and NSW to ensure businesses are meeting their industrial relations obligations.

From next week, the Fair Work Ombudsman will visit 50 businesses in the north-western regions of Queensland of Hughenden, Richmond, Julia Creek and Cloncurry.

Inspectors will doorknock employers to give them information packs containing fact sheets, templates and guides.

NSW visits will be conducted over a three-week period, with inspectors doorknocking about 60 businesses in Blacktown, 55 in Glebe and 50 in Lidcombe.

Another 60 visits will be made to businesses in Kings Cross and Potts Point and 50 in Randwick.

Fair Work Ombudsman Executive Director Michael Campbell says the informal visits are designed to help employers understand changes to the employment standards and the award modernisation process.

The process reduced the number of transport awards from more than 120 to three.

They took effect on July 1 this year and applied to employees who were not working under an enterprise agreement.

The three awards cover the general transport industry, long distance operations and the cash in transit sector.

There are also 10 national employment standards employers must meet, which include maximum hours of work, flexible working arrangements, leave entitlements and notice of termination and redundancy pay.



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