Poor road causes speed camera fault


RTA forced to fix dodgy road after investigation revealed it led to a speed camera inaccuracies

By Brad Gardner | October 20, 2010

The NSW Roads and Traffic Authority has been forced to upgrade a dodgy patch of road after an uneven surface caused speed camera inaccuracies.

Transport Minister John Robertson says the RTA received numerous complaints earlier this year from motorists over incorrect speed readings from the fixed camera in the northern Sydney suburb of North Narrabeen.

Robertson says the fault was due to the surface of the first of the three lanes on the route.

"Following comprehensive investigations and testing on the camera systems it was revealed that the issue was attributed to road surface instability for lane one only," he says.

"The road surface has since been rebuilt and the camera is currently fully operational."

The fault also required the RTA to withdraw all offences recorded for vehicles travelling in the first lane dating back to when the speed camera was switched on in April last year.

In an effort to assure motorists concerned about the accuracy of the monitoring technology, Robertson says all cameras are tested at least every 30 days for accuracy and are calibrated each year in line with national standards.

"In the interest of fairness to motorists, it is the RTA's practice not to proceed with any camera-based infringements whenever there is any doubt about the operation of fixed camera enforcement," Robertson says.

"In circumstances where a camera is found to have been operating inaccurately, the RTA proactively contacts motorists and fully reimburses the penalty and demerit points."

Victoria Police recently turned off all point-to-point cameras on the Hume Highway due to technical faults that led to nine drivers being wrongly charged with speeding.

Two of the nine of offences have been withdrawn, with police calling on the remaining drivers to come forward so the penalties can be wiped.

Deputy Police Commissioner Ken Lay says the cameras will not be switched on until an independent assessment verifies their accuracy.

"I am incredibly disappointed that this has happened," Lay says.



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