Baillieu pledges transparency on speed cameras


VTA backs government plan to publish the locations of mobile speed camera operations

By Ruza Zivkusic | February 1, 2011

The Victorian Transport Association (VTA) has welcomed the Baillieu Government’s decision to start publishing the locations of mobile speed camera operations, saying any measure that reduces the death toll is needed.

The Government has announced sweeping changes to Victoria’s traffic camera system to provide greater public accountability around speed and red-light cameras.

In a transparent move, the suite of measures include the appointment of Australia’s first independent road safety camera commissioner and public access to mobile speed camera locations, Deputy Premier and Minister for Police and Emergency Services Peter Ryan says.

"Victorians need to have the confidence that the state’s traffic camera network is accurate and has proper oversight, which is why the Coalition has requested that the auditor-general conduct an extensive investigation of speed camera operations and to report his findings to Parliament."

Roadside signs will also be better used to promote road safety, and a weekly list of mobile speed locations will be published by streets and suburbs.

A website called Cameras Save Lives will also be launched, containing regularly updated information about the number and value of traffic camera infringements and the camera locations with the highest number of infringements.

VTA Deputy CEO Neil Chambers believes speed cameras are one of the most important tools in reducing the road toll.

"By allowing people to understand where these cameras might be does have an impact in modifying driver behaviour, particularly in urban regions, so we think it’s good," Chambers says.

"You’d hope it assists heavy vehicle drivers and operators to ensure heavy vehicle drivers aren’t speeding and acting dangerously. Let’s hope it’s a positive approach."

A report, released by the Federal Government’s Department of Infrastructure and Transport in December last year, shows that seatbelts, random breath testing and speed cameras have reduced the Victorian road fatality by 40 percent since the late 1960s.


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