O'Farrell sworn in, but cabinet to be finalised


Barry O'Farrell has been sworn in as the NSW premier, but cabinet positions will not be known until next week

March 28, 2011

Barry O’Farrell has been sworn in as the new NSW premier after his resounding defeat of Labor, but cabinet positions are not expected to be named until next week.

O’Farrell wrested control of the state from Kristina Keneally in what was expected to be a lopsided poll on March 26.

He was sworn in alongside his deputy, Andrew Stoner, who was the opposition spokesman on roads during Premier Kristina Keneally’s reign. The ministerial appointments are expected to be named after counting has finished in all seats.

After his swearing in, O’Farrell committed to implementing his election commitments which include continuing efforts to introduce national trucking laws, expanding access for higher productivity vehicles and reining in the Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA).

"We’re determined to deliver those promises we talked about to the people of this state," O’Farrell says.

The Coalition has also pledged to halve licence fees for good drivers under its Fair Go for Safe Drivers strategy. Fees will be halved for those with an offence-free record of at least five years.

O’Farrell plans on establishing a dedicated infrastructure fund called Restart NSW that will allocate $5 billion to big-ticket items and the independently-chaired Infrastructure NSW to allocate projects based on need.

The Australian Industry Group (Ai Group) congratulated O’Farrell on his election victory and says it presents a real opportunity for NSW.

"The change of Government presents a real opportunity to reinvigorate NSW, address the state's underperformance and rebuild confidence in government," Ai Group NSW Director Mark Goodsell says.

"Mr O'Farrell is a highly experienced political leader who will bring a fresh perspective to the running of the state and its important role in influencing and shaping national priorities."

Prior to the election, the Ai Group urged the incoming government to focus on skills and training, harmonising occupational health and safety laws and reforming state taxes.

Following Labor’s defeat, Kristina Keneally stood down as leader and told supporters she would go to the backbench.


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