VicRoads focuses on education to prevent rollovers


Gravity, speed, friction and suspension are just some of the factors behind a truck rolling over

By Ruza Zivkusic | July 19, 2011

Gravity, speed, friction and suspension are just some of the factors behind a truck rolling over.

But family relations, the state of the road, the awareness of the driver and the load on the truck can also determine whether the driver will find himself in a rollover that for most is a "life-changing" experience, according to VicRoads transport safety services officer Alan Pincott.

Speaking at the Australian Livestock Transporters Association and the Livestock Transporters Association (LTAV/ALTA) 2011 national conference in Melbourne last Friday, Pincott says it comes down to the driver against contributing factors.

"All parties in the transport chain need to do what they can to eliminate, reduce or control as many of these factors we can do give the driver a chance," he says.

"Main focus is industry education and liaison; it’s about holding those responsible for their actions or lack of action.

"Our main concern is load security; when you talk to a professional operator the majority of them are fantastic. It’s those that do it once in a while that take shortcuts which is load restraint and specifically effluent."

The Victorian loading scheme for the transport of cattle, sheep and pigs is currently under review and VicRoads is seeking feedback, Pincott says.

More than 1,000 offences were committed since the scheme was introduced last year.

"The key to success is to find out what happens during a rollover and convince people of it," Pincott says.

"Most people that we talk to after a rollover say they didn’t know it happened."


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