Rogue truckies warned: Clean up or we'll get you


Trucking put on notice over speed limiters, with regulator warning it will come knocking if it detects tampering

Rogue truckies warned: Clean up or we'll get you
Rogue truckies warned: Clean up or we'll get you

February 24, 2012

The trucking industry has been put on notice over speed limiters, with the NSW Roads and Maritime Services warning it will put companies "under the spotlight" if it detects tampering.

Following its crackdown on Lennons Transport this week that uncovered alleged modifications to make trucks travel faster, the government department has issued a blunt message to all involved in road transport.

RMS Director of Regulatory Services Peter Wells says there is no legal justification to modify a speed limiter and that any owner or driver caught tinkering with the device will face consequences.

"It will instantly put you and your vehicle under the spotlight. We will examine your vehicle very closely and carefully look for evidence of any other modifications or defects," Wells says.

"If you or someone you know owns or drives a heavy vehicle with such a modification, now is the time to return it to manufacturers’ specifications."

NSW Police claims six of Lennons Transport’s trucks at the company’s Einfeld depot were tampered with, but Wells has indicated the practice is widespread.

"The majority of the Lennons Transport Services fleet was found to have illegal modifications to on-board speed limiters, designed to allow the vehicles to exceed the 100km/h heavy vehicle speed limit," he says.

"A number of the vehicles also had speed wheels fitted, another illegal modification which prevents excessive speeding being detected."

While saying dishonest trucking companies will be caught, Wells adds that it is important to remember the majority of heavy vehicle transport industry members are responsible and work to ensure their business operations comply with the law.

"Most owners and drivers do the right thing. This behaviour is limited to a rogue element of the industry," he says.

"To these law-breakers who are putting lives at risk by not following safe work practices the message is clear – RMS and NSW Police are working together - you will be caught and face serious criminal charges."

The RMS is currently undertaking a chain of responsibility investigation into Lennons and its supply chain partners and has declined to comment specifically on the matter.

"NSW road transport laws include chain of responsibility provisions which require all parties in the supply chain to take steps to stop breaches of mass, loading, dimension, driver fatigue and speeding laws," he says.

"If a person in the chain does not take reasonable steps to prevent offences under these laws, they can be found guilty of an offence, not just the driver."

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