South Australian authorities blitz Yamba


Bad brakes and excess mass lead list of problems encountered in two-day operation

May 10, 2012

Almost 10 percent of combinations inspected over two days at Yamba’s new vehicle checking station in South Australia’s Riverland region copped defect notices, according to Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure (DPTI) figures.

The Department and SafeWork SA
operation saw 542 heavy vehicles inspected, with major defect notices affecting 49 heavy vehicle combinations, sometimes for both prime movers and trailers.

These included:

  • 57 for brakes
  • 7 for steering
  • 5 for tyres
  • 5 for suspension
  • 3 for body defects.

On the spot fines, known as expiation notices, were issued, with 19 for excess mass, 10 for breaching gazetted conditions and five for unregistered vehicles or trailers.

Two drivers were reported for severe excess mass offences.

DPTI Acting Director of Transport Safety Regulation, Trent Rusby expressed frustration at the results.

"To continually see so many vehicles on the road in such a state where we are issuing major defect notices for basic compliance matters is extremely disappointing," Rusby says.

"This is not about issuing fines, it’s about making sure our roads and transport networks are safer – for all road users.

"These are serious issues that we shouldn’t be seeing from an industry at the heart of our transport system, not only is it about safety for other road users, but it’s about safety for the very people sitting behind the wheel as well.

"These types of defects can result in the most tragic of circumstances on our roads and we’re not about to make apologies for cracking down on compliance, especially when the result improves the outcome for everyone in getting these unsafe vehicles off the road."

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