SA aims for high heavy vehicle compliance rate


South Australia estimates 92 percent of trucks inspected at weigh stations this financial year will be compliant

By Brad Gardner | June 11, 2013

More than nine in 10 heavy vehicles passing through South Australia weigh stations this financial year are expected to be compliant, and the State is anticipating on the figure remaining the same in 2013-14.

State Budget papers show the majority of heavy vehicles randomly directed into weigh stations are meeting mass requirements, with South Australia estimating the final result for 2012-13 will be 92 percent.

The figure represents a slight increase over 2011-12, which was 91.7 percent. The Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure is aiming to maintain a strong compliance trend in 2013-14 with a target of 92 percent.

The department’s 2013-14 targets also include the transition of heavy vehicle regulatory functions to the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator, completing the South Road Superway and Southern Expressway projects and releasing a new three-year road safety plan to reduce road trauma.

Budget papers show $3.8 million is being spent over two years (2012-13 to 2013-14) on trucking-specific projects under the Federal Government’s Heavy Vehicle Safety and Productivity program.

South Australia is using $2 million of the money on new and upgraded rest areas along state-controlled arterial roads.

"The remaining $1.8 million will be paid as grants to local councils and the private sector for local road improvements and livestock saleyard improvements," Budget papers say.

Furthermore, South Australia will provide an additional $2 million next financial year for rest areas, with the money coming from the Rural Road Improvement Program.

The papers also point to significant increases in fines for people caught behind the wheel of an unregistered or uninsured vehicle. The fine for those driving an uninsured vehicle will rise from $619 to $1,500, while the fine for an unregistered vehicle will go from $335 to $1,000.

The Government says the increases are designed to act as a deterrent when compared to the existing cost of registering and insuring a vehicle.

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