Truck regulator lifts paperwork burden on drivers in North America


US truck drivers no longer need to file reports on vehicle inspections that show no defects.

Truck regulator lifts paperwork burden on drivers in North America
Truck drivers in the US spend about 46.7 million hours each year completing vehicle inspection reports.

 

The US trucking industry is tipped to save about $1.7 billion annually when existing paperwork requirements for heavy vehicle inspections are removed next week.

From December 18, truck drivers will no longer need to file a report on pre- and post-trip vehicle inspections if no defects or maintenance concerns are identified.

US transport laws currently require drivers to conduct vehicle inspections and then complete what is known as a Driver Vehicle Inspection Report (DVIR), even when no problems are found.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), which regulates the trucking industry in the US, estimates drivers spend about 46.7 million hours each year completing DVIRs.

"Eliminating DVIRs when no safety defects or mechanical deficiencies are identified will result in time savings valued at $1.7 billion annually," the agency says.

US transportation secretary Anthony Foxx says the reform means drivers can focus more on delivering freight instead of spending hours on unnecessary paperwork.

"This is a far better way to do business," he says.

FMCSA acting administrator Scott Darling says existing DVIR requirements rank 19th on the list of highest paperwork burdens across all federal agencies.

"By scrapping the no-defect inspection reports the burden is reduced to 79th, marking the most significant paperwork reduction achievement thus far in the Obama administration," he says.

The reform is part of president Barack Obama’s push to remove outdated and overly-burdensome regulations on the private sector.

The US Government in 2012 removed similar requirements on truck drivers operating trailers used for transporting containerised cargo shipments.

The FMCSA says the change led to an estimated annual saving of $54 million to the industry.

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