North American manufacturers welcome mandatory ESC for trucks


Equipment manufacturers says electronic stability control will improve safety for all road users.

North American manufacturers welcome mandatory ESC for trucks
The NHTSA estimates electronic stability control will cost US$585 per truck.

Vehicle and parts manufacturers have backed the requirement for trucks in the US to be fitted with electronic stability control (ESC).

The Motor and Equipment Manufacturers Association (MEMA), which represents suppliers of original and aftermarket equipment, says the technology will deliver benefits for all road users.

A National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) ruling means the majority of the US trucking fleet will need to adopt ESC by August 1, 2017.

All other trucks and buses manufactured on or after August 1, 2019 must have ESC fitted.

"Safety is a priority to our members, and the inclusion of electronic stability control technology on heavy-duty vehicles will prevent crashes and reduce fatalities, injuries and property damage," MEMA president and CEO Steve Handschuch says.

MEMA says it has been advocating the introduction of safety technology on trucks for more than 10 years and adds that the decision to mandate ESC has been long awaited.

The NHTSA estimates mandatory ESC for heavy vehicles will prevent 1,759 crashes, 649 injuries and 49 fatalities each year, as well as reducing by 56 per cent rollover crashes not caused by a vehicle striking an obstacle or leaving the road.

The Heavy Duty Manufacturers Association (HDMA), which is a division of MEMA, also supports the NHTSA’s ruling.

"Safety technology adoption in heavy-duty vehicles can offer unique challenges, but our industry welcomes the opportunity to add a technology that will improve safety for everyone on the roadway including drivers," HDMA president Timothy Kraus says.

"The addition of electronic stability control systems to commercial vehicles is a step in the right direction and we look forward to continuing to work with NHTSA and Truck and Engine Manufacturers Association to implement this new rule."

The NHTSA estimates ESC technology will deliver up to US$525 million in net benefits and will cost, on average, US$585 per truck.

 

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