Driverless vehicles gain government support in South Australia


South Australia will allow driverless cars to be tested on open, public roads.

Driverless vehicles gain government support in South Australia
South Australia transport minister Stephen Mullighan.

 

The South Australian government will pass the nation’s first laws allowing on-road trials of driverless vehicles.

Transport minister Stephen Mullighan will introduce the enabling legislation to State Parliament this week.

Mullighan says it will put South Australia "at the forefront" of the new industry predicted to be worth up to $90 billion in 15 years.

"We are on the cusp of the biggest advance in motoring since the since the Model T opened up car ownership to the masses," he says.

"By leading the charge, we are opening up countless new opportunities for our businesses and our economy."

Under the laws, trials of technology and autonomous vehicles will need to submit detailed plans at least a month beforehand. Appropriate levels of insurance must also be obtained.

"As the first state in Australia to regulate a framework for such testing, we are opening our doors to global businesses to develop and trial their technologies here, while also creating the right environment for local businesses to grow and flourish."

The legislation will not affect an autonomous vehicle testing project scheduled for November in Adelaide, as this will involve closed roads.

But the ARRB Group, which is leading the Australian Driverless Vehicle Initiative (ADVI), says the legislation will allow researchers to ‘dream big’.

"ARRB Group would like to congratulate the Government of South Australia on the introduction of laws that will allow for the on-road trials of driverless cars," a statement from the organisation notes.

"ARRB’s vision for the ADVI is to accelerate the safe and successful introduction of driverless vehicles onto Australian roads.

"The ADVI has been formed to provide a mechanism for industry, government and the community to have direct input into shaping how this happens."

 

 

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