ATA: Crash rate down 80 per cent


New figures show rate of fatal articulated truck crashes has fallen considerably since 1982

ATA: Crash rate down 80 per cent
ATA CEO Christopher Melham says the association will release state by state report cards for all major political parties and key candidates in the coming months.

 

The Australian Trucking Association has released new figures suggesting a marked decline in fatal truck crashes in Australia between 1982 and 2015.

The figures, which were compiled by the Centre for Automotive Safety Research (CASR) at the University of Adelaide using government statistics, show that the rate of fatal articulated truck crashes fell by 80 per cent during the period.

Articulated trucks include semitrailers and B-double combinations, the report suggests.

"Safety is always the trucking industry’s first priority," ATA CEO Christopher Melham says.

"These figures show the dramatic improvement we have achieved, with the fatal crash rate for articulated trucks falling by 80 per cent between 1982 and 2015.

"During this time, the number of articulated trucks on Australian roads doubled.

"Even as truck and car numbers have grown, the rate of fatal accidents has fallen thanks to better roads, improvements in vehicle design, stronger laws and the industry’s own commitment to safety."

The ATA also calls on politicians to commit to mandating stability control for trucks and trailers and reiterates its opposition to the now-defunct Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal (RSRT).

Melham says "even one accident is one too many. That’s why the ATA is using this election campaign to call on political parties and candidates in this election campaign to support practical measures to improve road safety.

"Stability control is an outstanding safety tool. There is compelling evidence that it would save lives, and it would open the way to even more advanced safety technologies that would save even more lives in the future."

"In contrast, there is no proven link between the price fixing established by the former Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal and safety."

"The safety figures used by the TWU [Transport Workers' Union] to justify the tribunal have been shown to be flawed.

"Instead of improving safety, the RSRT made small trucking businesses uncompetitive, and imposed an enormous paperwork burden on the industry."

In the months to come, the ATA will release state by state report cards for all major political parties and key candidates "assessing their policies against the industry’s election issues: no RSRT, practical measures to improve road safety and support for stronger trucking businesses".

 

 

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