ARTIO files evidence against GCCD

By: Anjali Behl


ARTIO NSW files evidence to back its opposition to TWU's minimum rates demand

ARTIO files evidence against GCCD
ARTIO NSW secretary Hugh McMaster says the Commission must consider how the market for general freight works, particularly in regional NSW, before making its decision.

 

The Australian Road Transport Industrial Organisation (ARTIO’s) New South Wales branch has filed evidence at the NSW Industrial Relations Commission to support its argument against the proposed standard minimum rates under the General Carriers Contract Determination (GCCD).

The Commission had earlier invited industry feedback on the Transport Workers Union (TWU’s) application that sought changes to the GCCD provisions.

ARTIO NSW secretary Hugh McMaster says the industry is opposed to a fixed rate regime and the Commission must "consider how the industry works before it makes a decision in this matter".

The employer body argues that TWU’s demand for standard minimum hourly and kilometre rates will have a negative impact on operators, owing to freight imbalance in metropolitan and regional transport.

ARTIO NSW’s application includes evidence form NSW-based operators, who have argued that instead of being able to negotiate rates for a job operators will have to pay standard rates based on kilometres travelled, which, they say, is unjustified for backhaul trips. 

McMaster says ARTIO NSW’s "evidence in the form of witness statements will assist the Commission and the parties before it in understanding how the market for general freight works, particularly in regional NSW.

"The TWU in NSW wants rates paid to owner drivers, known as contact carriers under NSW industrial law, to apply throughout NSW.

"Our evidence contained in statements from several witnesses with extensive practical experience in and understanding of freight markets in regional NSW highlights the difficulties, risks and impracticalities of extending rates coverage into these freight markets."

The GCCD debate has gathered momentum in the past few months, with many industry bodies comparing the interim and proposed changes and their implications to the now-defunct Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal (RSRT’s) Contractor Driver Minimum Payment Road Safety Remuneration Order (RSRO).

The Commission will hear arguments from the union and employer organisations during hearing later this month before coming to a decision by the end of this year.

 

 

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