Diesel LPG blend system for trucks cuts fuel consumption


Dual fuel system can save trucking operators up to 20 per cent, manufacturers claim.

Diesel LPG blend system for trucks cuts fuel consumption
A Cummins-powered Ford after the conversion to a dual fuel system.

 

Australian companies Diesel Gas Connection and Peel Instruments have partnered to provide truck operators with a diesel LPG blend system, converting a range of diesel engines to a dual-fuel alternative.

The collaborators, fitters Diesel Gas Connection and manufacturer and designer Peel Instruments, claim to increase torque and save fuel with an electronically-controlled and monitored LPG injection system, while also reducing emissions, such as particulate matter.

Peel Instruments says the conversion, which doesn’t require an engine rebuild or invasive intervention, provides medium-to-heavy truck operators with fuel savings up to 20 per cent; reduced stopping time due to increased fuel economy; and better engine longevity as oil remains cleaner.

According to Peel, a Freightliner with a 15-litre 620hp Cummins engine is saving $0.10 per kilometre after the conversion, using a 16 to 17 per cent LPG blend.

Mid-sized vehicles, such as six- to eight-litre Hino, Isuzu or Mitsubishi trucks, see a 10 to 25 per cent net gain in diesel consumption, Peel says, while a 5.7-litre Mercedes-Benz bus engine reported savings between 10 and 15 per cent.

The company says during three rounds of testing with a 14-litre, six-cylinder Ford truck, travelling 1,000km on diesel-only, a 10.5 per cent LPG blend, or an 18.5 per cent LPG blend, cost $860.25, $756.57, and $701.45 respectively.   

The savings equate to $73,900 over a 500,000km period, including the $5,500 conversion cost.

Peel Instruments says conversions can take place on pre- and post-2003 vehicles. However, emissions testing must take place for the newer engines.

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