Youth targeted in new Volvo safety campaign


See And Be Seen campaign to educate teenagers and young adults

Youth targeted in new Volvo safety campaign
The ‘See and be seen’ initiative focuses on awareness in traffic

 

The average age of truck drivers in Australia may be rising but the safety focus is increasingly on youth, with Volvo Trucks Australia’s new effort aimed at improving safety for young people around trucks.

The ‘See And Be Seen’ campaign and education program seeks to raise awareness among teenagers and young adults around heavy vehicles on the road and highlight potential dangers.

Volvo says two key aspects it aims to emphasise as part of the program are: 90 per cent of all traffic accidents involve human factors, such as lack of attention and misjudgement; and truck drivers have limited visibility close to the cab, and to prevent accidents between heavy vehicles and cyclists, we need to make sure that cyclists see and are seen.

Part of the program includes a 45-minute classroom training session, which covers how and why accidents happen between heavy vehicles and unprotected road users, along with tools to test awareness of safety risks and consequences. A video has also been produced to assist instructors in their training.

The program complements the company’s existing campaigns, including the Stop Look Wave program aimed at 5-12 year olds.


Read what the Stop Look Wave campaign means to Toxfree, here


"Research shows that accidents involving trucks and cars are on the decline due to improved safety technology such as the Volvo Trucks’ Lane Keeping Assist, Volvo Dynamic Steering and numerous other safety features that are engineered into our trucks," Volvo Group Australia vice president of marketing and communications Teresia Fors says.

"However accidents involving unprotected road users – such as cyclists, pedestrians and motorbike riders – are on the increase.

"Safety is one of Volvo’s core values. It is part of our clear vision to develop products and systems that prevent accidents from happening, and the consequences that could occur in the event of an accident."

Youth has been a primary target of safety campaigns in Australia of late, as highlighted by the ATA-supported Re:act program aimed at changing young car drivers' attitutes around trucks. 

 

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